Category: Events

Crowdsourcing analysis, an alternative approach to scientific research

Crowdsourcing analysis, an alternative approach to scientific research: Many Hands make tight work

Guest Lecture by Raphael Silberzahn, IESE Business School, University of Navarra

11:00 – 12:00, 9th of December, 2015

Lecture Theatre 6, The Diamond (32 Leavygreave Rd, Sheffield S3 7RD)

Is soccer players’ skin colour associated with how often they are shown a red card? The answer depends on how the data is analysed. With access to a dataset capturing the player-referee interactions of premiership players from the 2012-13 season in the English, German, French and Spanish leagues we organised a crowdsourced research project involving 29 different research teams and 61 individual researchers. Teams initially exchanged analytical approaches — but not results — and incorporated feedback from other teams into their analyses. Despite, the teams came to a broad range of conclusions. The overall group consensus (that a correlation exists) was much more tentative than would be expected from a single-team analysis. Raphael Silberzahn will provide insights from his perspective as one of the project coordinators and Tom Stafford will speak about his experience as a participant in this project. We will discuss how also smaller research projects can benefit from bringing together teams of skilled researchers to work simultaneously on the same data and thereby balance discussions and provide scientific findings with greater validity.

Links to coverage of this research in Nature (‘Crowdsourced research: Many hands make tight work’), and on FiveThirtyEight (‘Science Isn’t Broken: It’s just a hell of a lot harder than we give it credit for’). Our group’s analysis was supported by some great data exploration and visualisation work led by Mat Evans. You can see an interactive notebook of this work here

 

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Event: Crowdsourcing Psychology Data – Online, Mobile and Big Data approaches

StaffordFig3Smart phones, social media and networked sensors in everything from trains to toasters – The spread of digital technology creates new opportunities for cognitive scientists. Collecting and analysing the resulting “big data” also poses its own special challenges. This afternoon of talks and discussion is suitable for anyone curious about novel data collection and analysis strategies and how they can be deployed in psychological and behavioural research.

Time: 1pm-5pm, 11th of November 2014

Venue: Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield

We have four speakers followed by a panel discussion. Our speakers:

Martin Thirkettle: “Taking cognitive psychology to the small screen: Making a research focussed mobile app”

Developing a mobile app involves balancing a number of parties – researchers, funders, ethics committees, app developers, not to mention the end users. As the Open University’s “Brainwave” app, our first research-focussed cognitive psychology app, nears launch, I will discuss some of the challenges we’ve faced during the development process.

Caspar Addyman: “Measuring drug use with smartphones: Some misadventures”

Everyday drug use and its effects are not easily captured by lab or survey-based research. I developed the Boozerlyzer, an app that let people log their alcohol intake, their mood and play simple games that measured their cognitive and emotional responses. Although this had its flaws it led to a NHS funded collaboration to develop a simple smartphone tracker for Parkinson’s patients. Which was also problematic..

Robb Rutledge: “Crowdsourcing the cognitive science of decision making and well-being”

Some cognitive science questions can be particularly difficult to address in the lab. I will discuss results from The Great Brain Experiment, an app that allowed us to develop computational models for how decision making changes across the lifespan, and also how rewards and expectations relate to subjective well-being.

Andy Woods: “[C]lick your screen: probing the senses online”

We are at the cusp of some far-reaching technological advances that will be of tremendous benefit to research. Within a few short years we will be able to test thousands of people from any demographic with ‘connected’ technology every bit as good as we use in our labs today — indeed perhaps more so. Here I discuss on-web versus in-lab, predicted technological advances and issues with online research.

Tickets are free and available: here.

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